Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Western expansion In Africa and Asia Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Western expansion In Africa and Asia - Essay Example In the 14th century, Europeans mainly concentrated in the old system of trading, which connected Africa and Asia. The best ceramics and silks came from china, which prompted the Western states to develop interest in their products.China’s foremost interest was to obtain slaves from Africa, peacocks from India whereas African required cowrie shells and Maldives from the Indian Ocean (McKay et al 2011) Europeans wanted silk and spices from Asia but, unfortunately, they did not have desirable merchandise to give in return. The desire for Europeans to have full access in Asia led to the establishment of numerous empires and the western Hemisphere discovery where after few decades, they did dominate trading connections and political empires in most parts of the world. Consequently, this yielded to the exchange of cultural values, conversions and resistance due to global interactions besides prompting Europeans to fight with the aim of enforcing their cultural values. This was unto the societies that they encountered with the intention of making them understand the essence of the values (McKay et al 2011). (10) The West and Global Economy New imperialism Imperialism was the domination of a state especially based on political, economic and culture of another country (McKay et al 2011). Mainly, this emanated from the west where due to the growth in the industrial revolution and technology intended obtain materials from the less developed states. This is because of insignificant competition in those states by then who had low intellectual capacity, for instance Africa. Additionally, through this practice, the West used to augment their political and economic power, which enabled them to dominate the entire world through the influence of their affluence. European dominated both the African and china coastal territories but they were unable to the natives living in these regions, for instance, Africans, Chinese and Indians (McKay et al 2011). In the year 1800, Euro pe attained considerable power stability, since states, which had strong regimes emerged while the industrial revolution strengthened its numerous states’ economies. New imperialism emerged due to the economic interests by manufactures’ states who ventured in diverse regions in search of natural resources such as rubber and petroleum. Additionally, these states also wanted to get new and reliable markets meant for their industrial goods, which prompted them to apply political and military power to impose new imperialism. Merchant ships needed bases for taking coal and supplies, which led to the seizing of islands to satisfy their needs. In addition, nationalism was another factor that contributed to political interest in other states especially in the third world, where its states seemed to have uncouth civilization by then like Latin America and Africa (McKay et al 2011). The colonial states of then era encompassed the France, which annexed West Africa whereas its riv al Britain seized nearby lands to stop further expansion. Social Darwinism was another factor that led to new imperialism that was then growing among the westerners who practiced and supported the idea of social imperialism. Mainly, this entailed quest to destroy the weaker race because they deemed it was the nature’s way of improving human species. Trade In Indian Ocean Afro-Eurasian trade’s centralization in the Indian Ocean paved way for commercial and cultural exchange in Africa, Asia and Europe. It did increase trade between 7Th and 14Th centuries though it faced a sharp decline during the Black Death. Traders came together in multicultural forms around cities and ports (McKay et al 2011). Many of cities had attained self-governance, and there was minimal violence due to mutual and self-interest issues among the communities who represented the most developed group in the Southern China owing to their desirable trade merchandise. Africa also played a significant ro le in the then global trade besides economy prior

Friday, January 31, 2020

The buying back of shares is a dangerous financial strategy as it Essay

The buying back of shares is a dangerous financial strategy as it increases the company's capital gearing. Evaluate this - Essay Example There are different motives that would attract the companies to buy back the shares and there are different techniques that can be used to go through the process of stock repurchase. Different techniques that can are used by the companies for their stock buy-back are as follow: Company offers to purchase the shares from their shareholders at a premium price thus it gives value to them and extra return over price they actually had paid for the shares when they were bought. Companies often buy back their shares from the open market like an ordinary investor purchasing shares and making investment. It is often seen that the market and shareholders perceive the decision of the company to buy back the shares as a positive move and shareholders expecting higher returns stimulates stock price of the company (Larry, 1981). Motives for stock buyback Different circumstances and requirements of business conditions can influence management of share repurchase. Such motivating factors along with their reasons are discussed below: Market perception It is the perception of the shareholders and potential investors that exists in the market matters for future of company. Company is believed to use capital or extra finance available to them to buy back its shares thus giving the perception in market that there shareholders would be valued as they are provided the opportunity to trade possessed shares at the premium price (Udo & Richard, 2003). Thus removing any negative market perceptions that the stock price of the company has fallen and they have low future expectancy that what effects dealing of shares in market. It is often due to low earnings reported by the company in past some period, its operations effected by some scandal or lawsuit thus the share buyback is used as an option to remove any negative perceptions that are prevailing regarding the company in the market (David, et al., 1995). It is becomes necessary for the company to make the share buyback as market due to such instances and incidents might value the share price way low and shares are being traded at value that is below the expectancy of company thus in order to keep a standard for their shares in market and keeping value for their shareholders alive however it is believed that hike in share prices through this approach is of nominal period (Mansor, et al., 2011). Financial Ratios It is a usual practice in the market adopted by the investors before making any investment they make decisions on the basis of research and evaluation of the companies that are seem potential for the investment. Financial ratios of the company are most basic and foremost results that are used for the evaluation of the company. It is part of rational decision making of the investor as they evaluate their choice of investment before making the final decision (Amy, 2000). Thus share buyback can be the part of an accounting technique to get the desired results for the company as however it is the personal financ e of the company that they utilize to buy-back the shares thus it is confidence that the companies have on their abilities that makes them repurchase the outstanding shares that are either absorbed or turned to treasury stock. Thus the purchase reduces assets of company as it is the cash that is being paid for purchase of the shares therefore one of most important

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Individuality in Whitmans Song of Myself Essay -- Song of Myself Essa

Individuality in Whitman's Song of Myself During a lecture in 1907, William James said "the philosophy which is so important in each of us is not a technical matter; it is our more or less dumb sense of what life honestly means. It is only partly got from books; it is our individual way of just seeing and feeling the total push and pressure of the cosmos" (Bartlett 546) Individuality has been a prevalent theme in every type of literature for quite some time. Whether it is a character discovering his/her individuality or the author expressing his, literature is full of distinctness. The term individuality changes meaning with each person it meets. That is what makes the dynamic word so great. Throughout particular works read this semester, individuality has been the foundation for several of them. Walt Whitman takes his newfound ideas and Quaker background and introduces American Literature to a totally different meaning of individuality in "Song of Myself." Whitman's radical ideas of individualism have a great deal to do with his Quaker background. The Quaker religion is one in which the authority was Inner Light. "Whitman himself was not only personally familiar with, but deeply impressed by, a religion whose only authority was the Inner Light" (Canoy 481). The Inner Light is a special influence, which made Whitman's poetry unique. This certain influence did such things as guide Whitman down his soul searching path as well as help him define within himself the characteristics of an individual. In section fifteen of "Song of Myself," Whitman discusses people from every class and every profession. He goes on to say "the young fellow drives the express-wagon... love him though I do not know him;" (2753). ... ...either hasten their own delivery, not resist it" (2767). Would it really be that bad to be an individualist instead of conforming to the crowd? I do not think so. Works Cited *Bartlett, John. Bartlett's Familiar Quotations. Boston: Little,Brown and Company,1992. *Canby,Henry Seidel, Johnson, Thomas H., Ludwig,Richard M., Spiller, Robert E., Thorp, Willard. Literary History of the United States. New York: The MacMillian Company, 1963. *Franklin, Benjamin. Autobiography and Poor Richards almanacks. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. 3rd ed. Ed. Paul Lauter.Boston, NewYork: Houghton Mifflin,1998. *Renyolds, David S., Walt Whitman's America-A Cultural Biography. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995. *Whitman, Walt. Song of Myself. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. 3rd ed. Ed, Paul Lauter. Boston,NewYork: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. Individuality in Whitman's Song of Myself Essay -- Song of Myself Essa Individuality in Whitman's Song of Myself During a lecture in 1907, William James said "the philosophy which is so important in each of us is not a technical matter; it is our more or less dumb sense of what life honestly means. It is only partly got from books; it is our individual way of just seeing and feeling the total push and pressure of the cosmos" (Bartlett 546) Individuality has been a prevalent theme in every type of literature for quite some time. Whether it is a character discovering his/her individuality or the author expressing his, literature is full of distinctness. The term individuality changes meaning with each person it meets. That is what makes the dynamic word so great. Throughout particular works read this semester, individuality has been the foundation for several of them. Walt Whitman takes his newfound ideas and Quaker background and introduces American Literature to a totally different meaning of individuality in "Song of Myself." Whitman's radical ideas of individualism have a great deal to do with his Quaker background. The Quaker religion is one in which the authority was Inner Light. "Whitman himself was not only personally familiar with, but deeply impressed by, a religion whose only authority was the Inner Light" (Canoy 481). The Inner Light is a special influence, which made Whitman's poetry unique. This certain influence did such things as guide Whitman down his soul searching path as well as help him define within himself the characteristics of an individual. In section fifteen of "Song of Myself," Whitman discusses people from every class and every profession. He goes on to say "the young fellow drives the express-wagon... love him though I do not know him;" (2753). ... ...either hasten their own delivery, not resist it" (2767). Would it really be that bad to be an individualist instead of conforming to the crowd? I do not think so. Works Cited *Bartlett, John. Bartlett's Familiar Quotations. Boston: Little,Brown and Company,1992. *Canby,Henry Seidel, Johnson, Thomas H., Ludwig,Richard M., Spiller, Robert E., Thorp, Willard. Literary History of the United States. New York: The MacMillian Company, 1963. *Franklin, Benjamin. Autobiography and Poor Richards almanacks. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. 3rd ed. Ed. Paul Lauter.Boston, NewYork: Houghton Mifflin,1998. *Renyolds, David S., Walt Whitman's America-A Cultural Biography. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995. *Whitman, Walt. Song of Myself. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. 3rd ed. Ed, Paul Lauter. Boston,NewYork: Houghton Mifflin, 1998.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Oleana as a Tragedy

Oleana presents many definitive traits that could categorise it as a tragedy. The most prominent is the presence of a ‘harnartia', executed by John. Harnartia is Greek terminology that translates literally to â€Å"missing the mark†, and was often used to depict the ‘Hero's fatal flaw. In the case of Oleana, it could be argued that John committed the fatal error' of breaching the lawful gap between teacher and student by â€Å"placing his arm around† Carol while trying to soothe her.This sentimental reaction is generally condoned by the audience, despite the legal implications, as the motional reasoning behind it temporarily clouds the unprofessional elements. Ultimately these actions result in a string of misfortune. Tragedies also have a reputation for elating the audience, and encouraging conflicting emotions for the characters. Such is arguably achieved, as Carol is portrayed as a youthful woman whom is insecure in her own academic abilities and correspo ndingly becomes a victim to John's crass, arrogant attitude as is shown by an extreme amount of ellipsis and interruptions in their earlier interactions.She is also strained by that of her own group' whom convince her to liberate the dramatic allegations that guarantied John's downfall. However, she is also represented as vindictive and headstrong, as is shown by her dialogue in the last act wherein she attempts to blackmail John into rebuking his book: â€Å"If you would like me to speak to the tenure committee, here is my list. You are a free person, you decide. John is firstly depicted as a brash and slightly aloof man with good intentions, but as the story develops, these quirks lose their initial romance and his character appears intrusive and pompous, due to his esquipedalian qualities. He dominates the conversation and ushers Carol repeatedly; an action which is generally regarded as being extremely derogatory and advocates the belief that his elder status gives him a right to be condescending.Even disregarding the fact that they are of opposite sexes, it is strenuous to reach a conclusive, untainted resolve, and thus the desired effect is achieved. It is common in tragedies to have a ‘reversal' of fortune; this could be aligned with John's looming loss of power, Job, home, and, effectively, life, due to Carol's persecution. A great deal of his loss is arguably down to John's insolent action of belittling the resonance of a higher power; in this case the Tenure Committee.He believes that they will revoke the statement, and thus foolishly provides Carol with more opportunities to amplify damning evidence. This is an unmistakable trait in variations of Tragedies, generally tagged ‘hubris', wherein the equilibrium is only achieved after the hero suffers for their imprudence towards the Gods. Lastly, a key feature in any play is the chorus; a seemingly detached group, whom gather to inflict Judgements and muse over the ighteousness of the chara cter's actions throughout.The most relevant comparison to this in Oleana is the presence of the telephone, and the confliction and distraction it brings. This ongoing chaos could possibly be interpreted as foreshadowing for the misfortune that John was fated to experience, or the general tone of condemnation regarding John's various inappropriate actions towards Carol. In conclusion, there are many connections that can be made between a typical tragedy production and Oleana, and it would be completely valid to place Oleana in that genre. Oleana as a Tragedy By saraelnairree

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Ges Digital Revolution Redefining the E in Ge Analysis

GEs digital Revolution Redefining the E in GE Within 18 months of introducing the e-business initiative, Internet Week named GE the ~{!0~}Internet Company of the Year.~{!1~} How was GE to drive this ambitious company-wide program throughout its complex and diverse organizations so quickly and effectively? GE is a huge company, with 3 dozen of business areas, over 300 thousand employees and annual sales revenue as high as 129 billion in the year of 2000. It was the social architecture (culture and values) and operating systems (systems and processes) helped this complex and diverse organization to drive through changes quickly and effectively that have it named Internet Weeks top e-business of 2000. These deeply rooted†¦show more content†¦~{!0~}Operating System~{!1~} is GE~{!/~}s learning culture in action--in essence, it is the operating guideline of the company. As shown in exhibit 3, the Operating system is a year-round series of intense learning session in which business CEOs, role models and initiative champions from GE as well as outside companies need and share the intellectual capital to the world. The Operating System allows different GE businesses to operate at performance levels and speeds that would be unachievable were they on their own. The system functions acro ss departments, and also cross several key initiatives in GE history: the Globalization has been enriched dozens of cycles; Six Sigma, Service and e-Business are all being enriched with this cycle. GE keeps the accumulation of its own previous precious experience and also enriches these experiences in the new strategic cycles, especially in e-Business. The reason that E-Business initiative was driven successfully among this complex and diverse organization was that GE loves learning and keeps learning from both inside and outside. Firstly, in GE, people use six-sigma, the tool that can monitor and control production quality, to drive the manufacturing and even the quality control in e-Business areas. People work in the norm of systematic problem solving, which meansShow MoreRelatedGes Digital Revolution Redefining the E in Ge Analysis1058 Words   |  5 PagesGEs digital Revolution Redefining the E in GE Within 18 months of introducing the e-business initiative, Internet Week named GE the ~{!0~}Internet Company of the Year.~{!1~} How was GE to drive this ambitious company-wide program throughout its complex and diverse organizations so quickly and effectively? GE is a huge company, with 3 dozen of business areas, over 300 thousand employees and annual sales revenue as high as 129 billion in the year of 2000. It was the social architecture (cultureRead MoreComputime1008 Words   |  5 Pagesway to log customer complaints. If the complaints fall on deaf ears, nothing will be changed. The complaints need to be shared with the heads of the department as well as each business unit. To facilitate this communication, Computime could borrow GE’s Work-Out initiative and tweak it to meet their needs (Barlett Glinska, 2002). Computime could hold two-day meetings off-site for managers to listen to complaints of customers that are received by the front line employees. The managers can then addressRead MoreGes Two-Decade Transformation Jack Welchs Lea11469 Words   |  46 Pages9-399-150 REV: MAY 3, 2005 CHRISTOPHER A. BARTLETT MEG WOZNY GE s Two-Decade Transformation: Jack Welch s Leadership On September 7, 2001, Jack Welch stepped down as CEO of General Electric. The sense of pride he felt about the company s performance during the previous two decades seemed justified judging by the many accolades GE was receiving. For the third consecutive year, it had not only been named Fortune s Most Admired Company in the United States, but also Financial Times MostRead MoreSharing Economy10348 Words   |  42 Pagesbusiness models that attempt to tackle these issues by relying on the power of new technologies. These companies include sharing and community-building at the core of their DNA. This entrepreneurial movement, tagged as the sharing economy is redefining the nature of today’s business. The sharing economy refers to â€Å"economic and social systems that enable shared access to goods, services, data and talent. These systems take a variety of forms but all leverage information technology to empowerRead MoreStrategic Marketing Management337596 Words   |  1351 Pageswritten permission to reproduce any part of this publication should be addressed to the publisher Permissions may be sought directly from Elsevier’s Science Technology Rights Department in Oxford, UK: phone: ( 44) 1865 843830, fax: ( 44) 1865 853333, e-mail: permissions@elsevier.co.uk. You may also complete your request on-line via the Elsevier homepage (www.elsevier.com), by selecting ‘Customer Support’ and then ‘Obtaining Permissions’ British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue recordRead MoreMarketing Management130471 Words   |  522 Pagesrelationship management Marketing of services Rural marketing Types of marketing research Process of marketing research Tools and Techniques of marketing research Applications of marketing research Preparation of marketing research report Online marketing E-commerce Trends in marketing Page No. Marketing management – an introduction Unit structure: 1. Introduction 2. Learning Objectives 3. Marketing Management 3.1. Evolution of marketing management 3.2. The Role of Marketing 3.3. Marketing concepts

Monday, December 30, 2019

Race And Slavery During The 18th And Early 19th Century

RACE AND SLAVERY Timothy Smeja History 103 Professor Ricciardi 3/20/2017 During the 18th and early 19th century, race and slavery were contested subjects in the U.S. The definition of race during this era was not static, and one can find it in the essays written by such individuals as Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Cartwright, and Benjamin Rush. People supporting slavery used race as their main argument by highlighting the differences between Whites and Blacks. Works of Jefferson, Cartwright, and Rush highlight the different conceptions of race during this era. It is, therefore, important to learn about these conceptions to understand how race related to slavery in the past. The paper will thus dig into the analysis of the Jefferson†¦show more content†¦According to Jefferson, emancipation in the ancient Rome did not have the ability to support the highly disturbing aspect of racial mixing. Jefferson underlines that â€Å"among the Romans, emancipation needed but a single effort. The slave, when liberated, may mix with, without staining the blood of h is master†. According to Martin and Person, Jefferson’s strong rejection of the only chance of combining was, no doubt, out of accord with Douglass’ social objectives of that time, as it was out of accord with the Emerson’s perceptions of racial gradation as well. Further, historians also argue that Jefferson’s thinking is not in line with the various historical issues. They dismiss the perceptions of racial separatism as well as chauvinism, as highlighted by Jefferson, and the argument that Romans involved themselves in the enslavement as well as liberation and mixture of people of African origin puts itself forward. Additionally, Jefferson underlines that it is against all promotion of freedom to have slaves. Moreover, slavery does no good for the country, citing that no hardworking individuals exist when they can compel other people to do work for them. According to Jefferson, slavery is contrary to humankind’s God-given freedom. Therefore, there is no way God will continue to offer prosperity to the American people. Ultimately, Jefferson demonstrates hisShow MoreRelatedIntimate Frontiers1084 Words   |  5 Pagesperiod through the lens of gender-relations and sex, and through this lens the reader is able to better understand the unifying conditions of settlers and citizens in 19th century California. Hopes of prosperity were the most common and convincing appeal of travel to California from the early Spanish settlers in the 18th century, to the American and Chinese gold miners in the 1850s. Spanish missionaries formed the earliest settlements in the California territory, establishing missions in hopesRead MoreAfrican American And The American1464 Words   |  6 Pagessociety was changing, African American gain their freedom and their rights with the started of Abraham Lincoln. The story of an African American named Charlie Morris was one of many stories that people face discrimination throughout the history of race and ethnicity in American culture. African American spends many years trying to gain their freedom. Some African try to escape, other were killed for escaping. It wasn’t into Abraham Lincoln became the 16th president of the United States in 1860 andRead MoreThe 19th And 20th Century Imperialism1297 Words   |  6 PagesThe 19th and 20th century imperialism was substantially about the exploitation of the empires colonies and thus was not a necessarily an ‘civilizing mission’. During the 19th and 20th century European powers tried to justify their actions, by claiming that they were trying to re-educate the native population through education, this included Christian missionaries which were placed throughout Asia, Africa and Latin America. 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The word Slavery has a bitter taste flowing off the tongue.Read MoreThe Tyranny Of White Majority Essay1511 Words   |  7 Pagesthroughout the 19th and 20th century. Democratic reform throughout the century were implanted to eliminate the â€Å"tyranny of the white majority† Yet many scholars like Tocqueville, Fredrick Harris and WEB DuBois have challenged these results. The reality is that the tyranny of white majority has continued throughout the 18th to the 21st century resulting in a society that has suppressed and constantly f ailed to integrate African American into the white society by neglecting the race, using naturalRead MoreThe Atlantic Slave Trade Second Edition By Herbert S Klein And Economic Consequences Essay1273 Words   |  6 Pagesof slavery was confined to only Africans, there were also indentured servants and other forms of caste workers that involved other races. 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Saturday, December 21, 2019

The Strongest Man Upon the Earth Is He Who Stands Most...

According to Henrik Ibsen, â€Å"The strongest man upon the earth is he who stands most alone.† In other words, what this quote means is that the strongest man is the most independent; individuals who do not need to rely on others to survive. Individuals who stand alone are the ones who realize the strength within themselves and become powerful characters. This quote is valid because individuals who like to take actions on their own and at their own pace become the most successful. Two works of literature that support the validity of this statement are The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger and The Color of Water, by James McBride. The Color of Water, is a memoir, set in a variety of settings; from Suffolk, Virginia, to Wilmington,†¦show more content†¦For example, he was shipped to school and when he would get expelled; his parents paid no mind and sent him to another school. He lived away from his family for a great part of his life and because of being independent at such an early age; he later on endeared a mental breakdown and ended up in an asylum. However, being independent made Holden realize that he has a problem and that if he would not have gone to the asylum and seeked help from professions, then he would not have been able to become a stronger and more successful individual. Ultimately, The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger, and The Color of Water, by James McBride, both support the validity of the quote, â€Å"The strongest man upon the earth is he who stands most alone, said by author Henrik Ibsen. As life goes on, individuals will learn and realize that isolating yourself will not get you anywhere in life; it will only hurt you. You can be in control of your own destiny and you will gain perspective on your life. Both protagonists, Holden Caulfield and Ruth McBride, teach us that to ensure a prominent future, you need to overcome obstacles in all situations. This will better you as a person and will offer you a sense of what happens in the real world. Being independent allows you to see the world from a different perspective and no matter what life throws at you; you can get up from the ground, start again, and begin leadingShow MoreRelated65 Successful Harvard Business School Application Essays 2nd Edition 147256 Words   |  190 PagesGRIFFIN NEW YORK 65 SUCCESSFUL HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL APPLICATION ESSAYS, SECOND EDITION. Copyright  © 2009 byThe Harbus News Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. 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